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2022 UW–Madison Staff Climate Survey

Information about this survey is also available in Español, Hmoob, བོད་ཡིག Tibetan, 中文 Chinese, and नेपाली Nepali.

Summary of Results, Nov. 2022

In spring 2022, UW–Madison distributed the 2022 Staff Climate Survey to gather staff members’ thoughts, experiences, and concerns about working at the university. The survey was available electronically and on paper in six languages, and in-person assistance also was available in six languages.

6,480 staff participated in the survey, and the response rate (38%) was balanced across academic and university staff.

This preliminary summary of the results will be followed by the release of the full survey results later in fall 2022.

 

General Satisfaction Diversity and Inclusion Well-being While at Work Remote Work Hostile or Intimidating Behavior Sexual Harassment Workplace Retention Opportunities to Learn and Grow

General Satisfaction with UW–Madison

The majority of staff are satisfied with the university. Staff reported being “somewhat satisfied” or “very satisfied” both with UW–Madison (73%), and with their job (76%). Staff also reported that they would recommend UW–Madison as a good place to work (72%).

These general satisfaction results are comparable to those on the 2021 Best Places to Work in the Federal Government survey. Our score (73.5 out of 100) shows that UW–Madison staff are, on average, more satisfied than staff at federal agencies (66 out of 100).

Diversity and Inclusion

Staff feelings with their department or work unit were broadly positive. Most staff reported “very often” or “extremely often” feeling welcomed (77%), respected (72%), valued (65%), safe (90%), included (66%), and like they belong (66%).

Roughly ten percent of staff reported that in their department or work unit they “never” or “rarely” felt welcomed (6%), respected (8%), valued (12%), safe (3%), included (10%), or like they belong (10%).

Staff reported that it was “very important” or “extremely important” (85%) to them that UW–Madison, their school, college or division, and their department or work unit have a strong commitment to diversity. The majority of staff reported these groups as being “very committed” or “extremely committed” to diversity (UW–Madison (59%); school, college, or division (62%); department or work unit (67%)).

The majority of staff reported that their department or work unit is “very inclusive” or “extremely inclusive” to all employees regardless of their gender or gender identity (82%), sexual orientation (87%), race or ethnicity (79%), nationality or citizenship (84%), religious belief or customs (81%), political views or affiliations (70%), and disabilities (77%). In some instances, staff who identified in an underrepresented group reported the inclusivity of their department or work unit approximately 10 to 15 percentage points lower than those not in an underrepresented group.

Well-Being While at Work

The majority of staff rated their well-being while at work as “good,” “very good,” or “excellent” (76%), with no major differences seen between demographic groups. Roughly one quarter of staff rated their well-being at work as “poor” or “fair,” with 6% rating their well-being as “poor.”

Most staff reported being “very satisfied” or “extremely satisfied” with the support they receive for their well-being from their coworkers (73%), immediate supervisor (70%), and direct reports (74%), but less so with senior leaders (42%).

Remote Work

A majority of staff reported being “very satisfied” or “extremely satisfied” with the remote work policy at UW–Madison (54%) and at their school, college, or division (57%). Individuals who identity as LGBTQ+ or having a disability are less satisfied with the policy at UW–Madison.

Hostile or Intimidating Behavior

Overall, 44% of staff reported witnessing hostile or intimidating behavior on the UW–Madison campus within the last three years, and 38% said they had personally experienced such behavior on the UW–Madison campus within the last three years. Those who identified as nonbinary or other gendered were more likely to report witnessing hostile or intimidating behavior.

Fewer than half of staff reported that hostile or intimidating behavior is treated “very” or “extremely” seriously on campus (44%). Fewer than half of staff reported that they are “very comfortable” or “extremely comfortable” voicing concerns about hostile or intimidating behavior (41%).

On the UW–Madison Women in Science and Engineering Leadership Institute (WISELI) 2022 Study of Faculty Worklife, faculty reported witnessing HIB (47%) and experiencing HIB (38%) at similar rates.

Sexual Harassment

Six percent of staff reported personally experiencing sexual harassment on the UW–Madison campus in the last three years. Women and those who identified as nonbinary or other gendered were about twice as likely to report experiencing sexual harassment as men.

Most staff reported that sexual harassment is taken “very” or “extremely” seriously on campus (76%). Fifty-two percent reported that they know “very” or “extremely” well the steps to take if a person comes to them with a problem with sexual harassment. Forty percent of staff reported that the process for resolving complaints was “very” or “extremely” effective.

On the UW–Madison WISELI 2022 Study of Faculty Worklife, faculty reported experiencing sexual harassment on the UW–Madison campus at similar rates (5.3%).

Workplace Retention

Less than 20% of staff reported that they are “very likely” or “extremely likely” to leave their current job in the next 12 months (19%). A larger portion of University Staff reported being “very likely” or “extremely likely” to leave their current job in the next 12 months (35%).

Of those who reported they were “very likely” or “extremely likely” to leave their current job in the next 12 months, 64% indicated considering a job outside of UW–Madison, 43% indicated considering another job at UW–Madison, or were considering to retire (20%). Respondents could select more than one option.

The most commonly cited reasons staff would leave their current jobs are work environment, work life balance, stress level, salary, immediate supervisor, or benefits. Postdoctoral Staff are more likely to leave as a result of a change in funding, to obtain a promotion, or because of the employment situation of a spouse or partner.

These results are similar to UW–Madison’s average staff retention rate of 23%, with 14% leaving the university through retirement or resignation, and 9% changing positions within the university.

Opportunities to Learn and Grow

The majority of staff reported that their work is meaningful (67%), and that they have the resources to do their job well (65%). Roughly half of respondents reported that they have opportunities to learn and grow (54%) and receive useful feedback on their job performance (48%).

Next Steps

The offices of the Provost and the Vice Chancellor for Finance and Administration are continuing to work on this project. They will:

  1. Publish a final report with detailed analysis of all quantitative survey questions.
  2. Publish a data dashboard to provide the UW–Madison community with access to university, school, college, division, and department level results from all quantitative survey questions. To protect the confidentiality of those who participated in the survey, the dashboard will not show anyone the results of questions with fewer than 10 respondents.
  3. Analyze responses to qualitative survey questions and identify common themes.
  4. Meet with stakeholder and shared governance groups across the university to listen to feedback on the results.
  5. Collaborate with the schools, colleges, divisions, and shared governance groups to identify areas for improvement. Some items may be university-wide issues and may be coordinated centrally. Some action items may be unique to a school, college, or division and coordinated locally.

For general information about the survey, please contact the survey planning team at staffclimatesurvey@wisc.edu.